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Classic Cars Tag

Vintage Paparazzi / Posts tagged "Classic Cars"

Practical Everyday Transportation

The demands and shortages of World War II meant that transportation in the 1940s had to concentrate on practicality without frills or luxuries—vans and pickups were vital to move food and supplies to where they were needed, and off-road vehicles were required to carry troops...

U.S. Style-Setters

There was a huge appetite for new cars in post-war America, so car makers rushed into production, working with essentially pre-war body styles. These styles, however, had seen three seasons’ more development than European makes, since the United States had joined the war later. By...

Large Cars

After World War II, few people in Europe could afford large, luxurious sedans. Instead, most designs were conservative, and only figures such as government ministers, ambassadors, or doctors could justify a large, powerful car for their work. Cars were mostly updated pre-war creations with heavy...

Powerful Sports Tourers

Despite the 1929 stock market crash that precipitated a worldwide recession, the 1930s saw small manufacturers continue to make large-engined sports tourers, with ever-increasing refinement as the global economy recovered. The widespread building of high-quality surfaced roads allowed wealthy drivers to cruise at hitherto unimagined...

Magnificent and Exotic Body Styles

The 1930s saw the ultimate flowering of the coachbuilder’s art. The most exotic chassis, often adapted from state-of-the-art racing cars into road going performance machines, were dressed in the most stylish, streamlined, luxurious, and even decadent bodywork the world had yet seen. It is no...

Lincoln-Zephyr

Traditionally associated with high-priced luxury, the Ford-owned Lincoln marque offered buyers its least-expensive model to date with the 1936 Zephyr. Featuring Lincoln’s first unibody construction-in all-steel—and powered by a new V12 engine, the Zephyr thrilled with its daring, sleek design. Launched at the 1936 New...

Streamlined Cars

The vast majority of drivers in the 1930s were perfectly happy with their spacious, easily-accessed, upright, slab-fronted cars. But now that cars were capable of comfortably exceeding 80 mph (129 km/h) a small number of stylists and engineers in the United States and Europe were...

Volkswagen Flat-Four

Commissioned to create a people’s car (Volks Wagen) by Adolf Hitler, Ferdinand Porsche designed an engine that was cooled by air rather than water, saving the weight and complication of a radiator, water pump, and hoses. When car production resumed after World War II, the...

Mass-Market Models

In the 1930s motoring became popular for the middle classes of the United States and Europe, with discerning buyers choosing cars for reliability and power, spaciousness and price. In the United States, new marques such as Pontiac were created to cater to the mass market,...