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    Pajama Game Fashions

    Pajamas don’t just go to bed any more. Styled as smartly as sports clothes and with as much variety as dresses, they’re intended to be seen—whether entertaining at home, loafing or watching TV. And they’re fun! You see all kinds now with checks, stripes, polka dots or hearts. So take a cue from Doris and Carol in “The Pajama Game” and our starlets, Neile, Sandra and Mary, partying here, and go gay in pajamas.






    You know, time was when a girl had to slip into the boys’ department for a pair of pajamas. In fact, American girls didn’t even wear them. The mere idea of them was as startling to most people as the first movie. For, as these very early movies have recorded for posterity, nighties were what a lady wore upon retiring for bed. However, just as movies have undergone tremendous changes since the days they so shyly and silently flickered. so have a young lady’s pajamas and nightgowns evolved into their present-day shape. And beds have come a long way, too. Not only have their mattresses changed, so have their shapes. Look at Mary Wooden’s round bed. She found it in New York City at Norman Dine’s Sleep Center.






    A round bed is perfect to hold “Nights at the Round” in, but any shape bed does nicely, too, for pajama parties. They’re a wonderful form of entertainment, especially to catch up on who did what over the summer vacation before getting back into the swing of school. And they’re easy. Here are the necessary ingredients: People—two or more girls make a good gathering plus the hostess. Place—anywhere there’s enough floor space to accommodate the number of guests you plan to invite. (Be sure to remind them to bring along pillows and blankets. You can do this in a written invitation.) Entertainment—good games and, of course, gossip—one of the main reasons for having the party! Refreshments—appetizing food that’s simple to prepare, and delicious drinks, also easy to make. Music—a variety of records to match your mood and provide a pleasant background.



    Introduce your social circle to a fun idea: how to play in pajamas . . . including such specifics as music, refreshments, games, atmosphere and a good old-fashioned hen session

     




    Mary Wooden had a perfect pajama party because she followed this. foolproof formula. Her guests: Neile Adams, whom you may remember from her first film, “This Could Be the Night” (incidentally, Neile wore pajamas in that movie and is now touring the play “The Pajama Game” around the country); Sandra Dee, a top model and cover girl before becoming a starlet. Both left Mary’s party tired but happy. They’d gabbed about their past two months, movies, males and girl friends until Mary insisted they take a vow. “We heard nothing, saw nothing, said nothing that we’ll tell anyone else. We’re the three monkey-teers! Agreed?” Agreed. Secrets are fun! And so are games when three or more get together.






    Neile explained her favorite, called “Predicaments and Remedies.” “You divide up into two teams facing each other. On Team ‘A’ each player whispers a predicament into a teammate’s ear (example: ‘What would you do if Don kissed you?’). At the same time, Team ‘B’ members think of a remedy (example: ‘Join the Army’). Then each Team ‘A’ player states her predicament out loud to the facing Team ‘B’ player and hears her remedy.” Imagine the goofy results!










    The girls nibbled on Mary’s “Cherry Chip Dip” (made by blending 1 large package cream cheese, 1 cup sour cream, ½ cup chopped maraschino cherries, 2 tablespoons cherry juice), ate it on potato chips. But of course they were still hungry. So while Sandra took off the records they’d just heard—Teenage Hop” by Warren Covington and the Commanders (Decca Album)—and put on “Belafonte Sings of the Caribbean” (RCA Victor), Mary whipped out to the kitchen for her “Face-Up Sandwiches” and special “Sparked Cokes.” This crazy drink (made by freezing coffee in ice cube trays, adding the coffee cubes to cokes) is a current fad. Mary’s sandwich spread is easy to make: Blend 1 cup peanut butter, small package cream cheese, 1 teaspoon milk; top with crumbled crisp bacon.

    “We gorged ourselves till three in the morning and looked a wreck the next day,” laughed Neile. “But what fun!” (And they vowed to do it again!)

     

    It is a quote. PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE OCTOBER 1957



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