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    Hollywood Lip Tips

    Maybe you weren’t lucky enough to be born, like Ava Gardner, with a perfect mouth. But you can create that impression with make-up—and no. one need be the wiser. The trick, explains William Tuttle, chief make-up advisor to M-G-M’s bevy of beauties, is to draw lips that harmonize with the rest of your features.



    “Every face,” he says, “has its own pattern of lines and curves. Imagine, if you can, Lana Turner’s full, round lips on Katharine Hepburn’s slim, angular face! Or vice versa!” For a face that is slender and high-cheekboned, like Hepburn’s or Joan Crawford’s, with almond-shaped eyes and a long, straight nose, skip all suggestion of roundness, Bill advises. Points of cupid’s bow should be sharp or drawn straight across and squared-off. If, like Lana, or Ann Miller, you have round eyes, a small, round nose and curved cheeks, your mouth should be round, too, and softly curving.






    A point that’s often overlooked, except by professionals, he says, is the position of the lips in relation to the nose and chin. Ideally, the opening of the mouth should be one-third of the way down from nose to chin. If mouth opening is too low, upper lip should be built up; too high, fullness should be added to lower lip line.



    If nature was stingy, Bill suggests making points of cupid’s bow higher and closer together to create the impression of fuller lips. To make a too-narrow mouth appear broader from corner to corner, build out and extend portions near corner of both upper and lower lips. The overly generous mouth can be made to appear thinner by spreading points of cupid’s bow and drawing center of lower lip straight across—no curves. If mouth is too broad from corner to corner, raise center, only, of upper lip and drop center of lower lip. Drooping corners, a flaw common to almost every pair of lips, creates an unhappy expression, adds years to the face—and gets worse with the years. Best way to counter-act the droop is to smile! It’s a good idea, too, to build up the corners of the upper lip slightly, to give a faint suggestion of an upturn.



    To keep your artwork looking natural, cover mouth well with foundation and face powder before applying lipstick. If the natural line is pronounced and corrective lines go above it, the ridge will be less apparent if you use a darker shade of lipstick for the outline, blending gradually into a lighter shade toward mouth opening. Of course, you’ll use a lipstick brush for a sharp, clear outline. And in making all changes, draw only the tiniest fraction of an inch above or below the natural lips. You’ll find that just a hairline difference provides all the change you need.

     

    It is a quote. PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 1956



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