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    The Visible Invisible Marlon Brando

    Marlon Brando reminds us of the young boy, age two, who stands in front of you with his hands over his face and you’re supposed to say, “Where is little Marlon?” He replies by taking his hands away from his face, thus believing that he reveals himself to you—when you knew he was standing there all the time.



    As you all know, Marlon has a ban on what he terms “fan magazine” stories and pictures and he has issued an order to the Samuel Goldwyn studios and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer that he will pose for pictures only under the stipulation that they cannot be used for fan magazines except in connection with his role in “Guys and Dolls.”








    You ask him for his autograph. Sure, he’ll give it to you. You ask him if you can form a fan club on his behalf with charitable objectives. Sure, he’ll let you. He’ll even condescend to let fan magazines, abhorrent to him as they are, publish his picture—if it advertises his latest film, “Guys and Dolls.” Sure he will—after all, he’s no fool. He knows that you are the people who pay for tickets at the motion-picture theatres and he cannot afford to have his fans insulted. But, he’ll quickly add, he hates fan-magazine editors. Marlon hated them ever since he decided he didn’t like the role he created under the expert guidance of a top-notch publicity man who taught him how to make colorful copy at a time when he needed all the stories and pictures he could get in any magazine.






    In those days, too, he was not at all averse to accepting the honors bestowed upon him by fans—he was one of the players you chose in the “Choose Your Star” poll of newcomers as the actor who would become one of the great stars of the year 1951. And now he is too great to believe in the magazines through which you honor him.

    We think it’s about time that you, the fans, knew this about Brando and that you did something about it.



    After all, Marlon’s too big to be invisible—and too big a star to be ignored.

    So if you don’t like his new role of invisible man, either, send in the attached coupon to Photoplay, Post Office Box No. 25486, West Los Angeles 25, Calif.

     

    It is a quote. PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 1955



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